Call Anytime. 24/7
(844) 634-5656

Grill Safety: Tips and Tricks

/
Blog/ Uncategorized/ Grill Safety: Tips and Tricks

Summer is almost here and that means outdoor grills will be cooking meals for families all over the country. That familiar smell will be wafting through neighborhoods, causing many hungry mouths to yearn for the familiar taste of barbecue. Grilling is one of the most popular ways to cook in the country, but it resulted in 18,000 trips to the emergency room just last year. With a few safety precautions, however, you can prevent injuries from happening to you when you grill.

Be aware of any odors

If you are using a propane grill it is always wise to be aware of the smells around you. Any odor that smells like propane or gas could mean a leak in the hose and could be dangerous. If you do smell any gas odors, step back and call the fire department immediately since they are better equipped to handle the situation than you are.

The National Fire Protection Association recommends that you check the hose to your propane grill before the first use of every year to ensure that everything is working properly. You can do this by spraying it with a mix of soap and water. Any leaks in the hose will bubble up and reveal themselves.

Remove grease from the grill

When you cook, the old grease and fat from meat often drips down into the bottom of the grill or drip pan, which can cause a fire hazard. Grease and fat are both extremely flammable, so it is vital to always clean off the grill pan before your next cooking session.

Likewise, use a bristle brush to clean off the top of the metal grate that you cooked your meat on. Even if it looks fine, grease can harden and melt off when the grill is fired up or even during the cooking process, causing flames to shoot up in your face.

Keep your grill in an open area

Since grills deal directly with fire and gas, it’s important to keep it in an open area. This means that it needs to be out from under trees and away from any furniture. The Consumer Product Safety Commission suggests using your grill at least 10 feet away from your home or anything flammable.

Never use your grill indoors. Aside from the flammability factor, charcoal grills give off carbon monoxide, which is an odorless gas that is toxic to your health. Burning the grill inside of your house can cause you serious injury or illness, as well as kill you.

Grills not only cause injuries, they have been known to start large fires. If you have any issues with your grill, or if you’re unsure if you smell something to be concerned about, always err on the safe side. Grill safety is one thing you always want to keep up on.

Summer is almost here and that means outdoor grills will be cooking meals for families all over the country. That familiar smell will be wafting through neighborhoods, causing many hungry mouths to yearn for the familiar taste of barbecue. Grilling is one of the most popular ways to cook in the country, but it resulted in 18,000 trips to the emergency room just last year. With a few safety precautions, however, you can prevent injuries from happening to you when you grill.

If you are using a propane grill it is always wise to be aware of the smells around you. Any odor that smells like propane or gas could mean a leak in the hose and could be dangerous. If you do smell any gas odors, step back and call the fire department immediately since they are better equipped to handle the situation than you are.

The National Fire Protection Association recommends that you check the hose to your propane grill before the first use of every year to ensure that everything is working properly. You can do this by spraying it with a mix of soap and water. Any leaks in the hose will bubble up and reveal themselves.

When you cook, the old grease and fat from meat often drips down into the bottom of the grill or drip pan, which can cause a fire hazard. Grease and fat are both extremely flammable, so it is vital to always clean off the grill pan before your next cooking session.

Likewise, use a bristle brush to clean off the top of the metal grate that you cooked your meat on. Even if it looks fine, grease can harden and melt off when the grill is fired up or even during the cooking process, causing flames to shoot up in your face.

Since grills deal directly with fire and gas, it’s important to keep it in an open area. This means that it needs to be out from under trees and away from any furniture. The Consumer Product Safety Commission suggests using your grill at least 10 feet away from your home or anything flammable.

Never use your grill indoors. Aside from the flammability factor, charcoal grills give off carbon monoxide, which is an odorless gas that is toxic to your health. Burning the grill inside of your house can cause you serious injury or illness, as well as kill you.

Grills not only cause injuries, they have been known to start large fires. If you have any issues with your grill, or if you’re unsure if you smell something to be concerned about, always err on the safe side. Grill safety is one thing you always want to keep up on.